Thematic Bible




Thematic Bible




one Joseph of Arimathea, an honourable senator, who was himself in expectation of the kingdom of God, ventur'd to come and wait upon Pilate, and begged the body of Jesus.


and he openly preach'd in the name of the Lord Jesus, and disputed against the Hellenists, who therefore plotted against his life:

however the apostles stay'd there a considerable time, being inspir'd with great resolution by the Lord, who gave his attestation to the evangelical doctrine, by the prodigys and miracles, which he did by their hands.

At length Paul went to the synagogue, where he spoke with great freedom, and for three months he conferr'd with them to persuade them of the truth of the evangelical kingdom.

preaching the kingdom of God, and instructing them in all things relating to the Lord Jesus Christ, with the utmost freedom, without being molested.


At length Paul went to the synagogue, where he spoke with great freedom, and for three months he conferr'd with them to persuade them of the truth of the evangelical kingdom.



thereupon Barnabas took him with him to the apostles, and related to them how the Lord had appear'd to him on his journey, and had spoken to him, and how publickly Saul had preach'd at Damascus in the name of Jesus.


after he had stay'd there some time, he departed and pass'd through all Galatia and Phrygia, where he encourag'd the disciples. In the mean time a Jew, nam'd Apollos, born at Alexandria, a man of letters, and vers'd in the scriptures, arriv'd at Ephesus. he had been instructed in the doctrine of the gospel, and being full of zeal, he harangued with great assiduity about what related to Jesus, though he had been only instituted in the baptism of John. read more.
having talk'd with great freedom in the synagogue, Aquila and Priscilla, who had heard him, invited him home, and gave him a more distinct view of the gospel. and being determin'd to pass into Achaia, the brethren who advis'd him to it, writ to the disciples to receive him. when he was arrived, he was, by the divine favour, very useful to those, who had receiv'd the faith. for he strenuously disputed with the Jews in publick, proving from the scriptures that Jesus was the Messiah. Whilst Apollos was at Corinth, Paul, having pass'd through the upper provinces of Asia, arrived at Ephesus, where finding some disciples, he said to them, did you receive the holy spirit, when you made profession of your faith? they answer'd, we have not so much as heard of a holy spirit. what baptism then, said he, did you receive? they replied, the baptism of John. upon which Paul said, John indeed administer'd the baptism of repentance, but with this admonition, that they should believe in him, who was to come after, that is, in Jesus the Messias. when they heard this, they were initiated by baptism into the christian profession. and Paul having given them imposition of hands, the holy spirit came upon them, and they spoke foreign languages, and prophesied: the number of them being about twelve. At length Paul went to the synagogue, where he spoke with great freedom, and for three months he conferr'd with them to persuade them of the truth of the evangelical kingdom. but some of them being such obdurate infidels as to inveigh against the institution before the populace, he retired, and taking the disciples with him, he instructed them daily in the school of one Tyrannus. this he continued for two years; so that the Jews and proselytes of that part of Asia heard the doctrine of the Lord Jesus. the miracles which God wrought by the ministry of Paul being of such an extraordinary nature, that by applying the handkerchiefs, or aprons that had touch'd his skin, to the distemper'd, they were cured, and the evil spirits came out of the possessed. Upon this, certain vagabond Jews, who were exorcists, pretended to cure demoniacs by pronouncing the name of the Lord Jesus: their form being this, "I adjure you by Jesus whom Paul preaches." these practitioners were seven in number, the sons of Sceva a Jew, one of the chief priests. but the evil spirit said to them, "Jesus I know, and Paul I know; but who are ye?" the man who was possess'd immediately leapt upon them, got the better, and used them so roughly, they were forc'd to fly out of the house, cover'd with nothing but their wounds. this was known to all the Jews and Greeks, that liv'd at Ephesus, who were all seiz'd with fear, and the name of the Lord Jesus was exalted. many that believed came to confess, and give an account of their past actions. many that had practis'd magical arts, brought the books and publickly threw them into the fire: the value by computation amounting to fifty thousand pieces of silver. thus the christian doctrine flourish'd and prevail'd. after this, Paul had a design to pass thro' Macedonia and Achaia in his way to Jerusalem: purposing when he had been there to make a visit to Rome. he sent therefore Timothy and Erastus, two of his assistants in the ministry, before to Macedonia; but stay'd himself in Asia for some time. It was then a tumult happen'd at Ephesus upon account of the christian sect. for one Demetrius, a silver-smith, who made little models of Diana's temple, and so furnish'd a deal of employment to the workmen in that trade, summon'd the company, and thus address'd them, "tho' you know, sirs, it is by this craft that we are in such plight, yet your own eyes and ears have inform'd you, that not only at Ephesus, but almost throughout all Asia, this Paul by his persuasions has turn'd the heads of a world of people, asserting, that these are Gods of our own making, and not really such. so that not only our profession runs the risk of being vilified; but the temple of the great goddess Diana will be depreciated, and her majesty, so rever'd thro' all Asia, and the whole world, will be discarded." at these words, they were fir'd with indignation, and cry'd out, "great is Diana of the Ephesians." and the whole city was fill'd with confusion: all crouded in a body to the theatre, dragging with them Gaius and Aristarchus, both of Macedonia, who had travell'd with Paul. upon this Paul was bent upon going. to the populace, but was prevented by his disciples, and by the primates of Asia, who were his friends, and sent to desire he would not venture to the theatre: there the mob were in the utmost riot, some bawling out in one cry, some in another, and the greatest part at a loss to know why they were met. at last Alexander was disengag'd from the croud, and accus'd by the Jews. then he waved his hand, desiring to make his defence before them all. but when they knew he was a Jew, they cry'd out one and all for the space of two hours, "great is Diana of the Ephesians." at length the town-clerk appeased the people, and thus began, "who is there, O Ephesians, that does not know, that the city of Ephesus is the guardian of the temple of the great Diana, and of her statue, which fell from heaven: since this is incontestible, it behoves you to be easy, and free from any rash conduct: for the men you have brought here, have neither plunder'd your temples, nor inveigh'd against your goddess. if Demetrius and the other artists, that are with him, can lay their action against any man, the law is open, and the proconsul is near; let them begin their process. but if the contest be about other matters, it may be decided in a regular assembly. for we run the risk of being answerable for this day's sedition: there being no justifiable occasion for such a commotion." having thus harangued them, he broke up the assembly. This disturbance being over, Paul sent for the disciples, took his leave and departed for Macedonia. after having visited the faithful in those parts, and given them many exhortations, he went to Greece. there he stay'd three months; and then the Jews conspiring to surprize him at his embarkation for Syria, it was thought adviseable he should return thro' Macedonia. Sopater of Berea, Aristarchus and Secundus of Thessalonica, Gaius of Derby and Timothy, Tychicus and Trophimus both Asiatics, all accompanied him to Asia, and then advanc'd before and waited for us at Troas. after the feast of unleaven'd bread we sail'd from Philippi, and in five days we join'd them at Troas, where we stay'd seven. on the first day of the week we assembled to break bread, when Paul, who was to depart on the morrow, gave them a sermon, which lasted till midnight. in the upper chamber where we were assembled, several lamps were burning: and as Paul continued his discourse a great while, a young man, named Eutychus, who was sitting in the window, was seiz'd with a deep sleep, which quite o'er-came him; so that he fell down from the third story, and was taken up dead. so Paul went down, and stooping over him, he embraced him, and said, don't trouble your selves; for his life is in him. then Paul went up again, and having broken bread and eaten, he reassumed his discourse till break of day, and then departed. but the young man was brought in alive and well, to the joy of the whole assembly. As for us, we embark'd, and sail'd to Assos, where by appointment Paul was to be taken aboard, designing himself to go thither by land. meeting with him at Assos, we took him in and arriv'd at Mitylene: from thence we bore away: the next day we came off Chios, and the day after we pass'd by Samos, landing at Trogyllium, and arrived at Miletus the next day. for Paul had determined not to go ashore at Ephesus, to avoid losing time in Asia: because he was eager to get to Jerusalem, if possible, by the day of pentecost. At Miletus he sent a message to the pastors of the church at Ephesus, to come to him: and when they were arriv'd he told them, you know how I have always behav'd towards you from the first day of my arrival in Asia: how I have serv'd the Lord with all resignation, with tears, and trials occasion'd by the insidious practices of the Jews: that I have conceal'd nothing that might be useful to you, but have inform'd you of it, and instructed you therein, both in publick and in private: remonstrating both to Jews and Gentiles the advantages of a sincere repentance, and of believing in our Lord Jesus Christ. but now I am fix'd in my resolution to go to Jerusalem, without any apprehension of what may befal me there: save what the holy spirit in every city declares, "that bonds and afflictions wait for me." things that little affect me, nor is life so much my concern, as to finish my course, and the charge I receiv'd from the Lord Jesus, to attest the declaration of the divine favour. and now I am persuaded you will none of you see my face any more: whilst I have been among you, I have proclaim'd the kingdom of the Messias: I therefore declare to you at this present time, that I am not responsible for the ruin of any: for I have acquainted you with the whole dispensation of God without reserve. be therefore upon your guard to secure your selves, and the whole flock over which the holy spirit has made you overseers, to feed the church of God, which he has purchased with his own blood. for I know when I am gone, you will be oppress'd by wolves, that will not spare the flock. nay, among your own body some will start up to vent their intricate conceits, and draw a number of followers. be then upon the watch, and remember, that for three years I have not ceased by night, or by day to warn every soul of you, even with tears. and now, my brethren, I recommend you to God, and to his gracious dispensation, which is able to improve you, and secure to you the inheritance with those who are sanctify'd. I have not desir'd to get from any one either silver, or gold, or apparel. you yourselves can witness, that what was necessary for myself and those who were with me, these very hands have supply'd. my constant example has shown you that the disabled should be assisted by your labours, remembring the words of the Lord Jesus, who said, "it is a greater happiness to give than to receive." After this discourse, he kneeled down, and prayed with them all. then melted into tears, they fell upon his neck and kissed him, being more particularly afflicted at his having said, "they should see his face no more." and then they conducted him to the ship. After we were parted from them, and clear of land, we made directly for Cos, the next day to Rhodes, and from thence to Patara: where finding a vessel bound to Phoenicia, we went aboard, and put off. having made Cyprus, leaving it to the North, we took our course to Syria, and landed at Tyre, where the ship was to unlade her cargo. we staid seven days with the disciples we met there: who told Paul from the holy spirit, that he should not go to Jerusalem. that time being ended, we departed, being conducted by them in a body with the women and children quite out of the city, where we kneeled down on the shore, and prayed. then having taken our leave of one another, we embark'd and they went home. From Tyre we sail'd to Ptolemais, which ended our voyage. we saluted the brethren there, and staid a day with them. on the morrow we set out, and arriv'd at Cesarea, and went to the house of Philip the evangelist, with whom we lodg'd: he was one of the seven deacons, and had four daughters all virgins, prophetesses. after we had been there several days, a prophet arriv'd from Judea, one Agabus, who made us a visit. when taking Paul's girdle, he bound his own feet and hands, and said, "thus saith the holy spirit, so shall the Jews at Jerusalem bind the man, that owns this girdle, and deliver him into the hands of the Gentiles." upon hearing this, we and some of the city intreated him not to go to Jerusalem. but Paul replied, what do you mean by afflicting me thus with your tears? I am not only ready to meet my chains, but even to die at Jerusalem, for the name of the Lord Jesus. he being then inflexible, we desisted, saying, the will of the Lord be done. after this we prepar'd for our journey to Jerusalem.


after he had stay'd there some time, he departed and pass'd through all Galatia and Phrygia, where he encourag'd the disciples. In the mean time a Jew, nam'd Apollos, born at Alexandria, a man of letters, and vers'd in the scriptures, arriv'd at Ephesus. he had been instructed in the doctrine of the gospel, and being full of zeal, he harangued with great assiduity about what related to Jesus, though he had been only instituted in the baptism of John. read more.
having talk'd with great freedom in the synagogue, Aquila and Priscilla, who had heard him, invited him home, and gave him a more distinct view of the gospel. and being determin'd to pass into Achaia, the brethren who advis'd him to it, writ to the disciples to receive him. when he was arrived, he was, by the divine favour, very useful to those, who had receiv'd the faith. for he strenuously disputed with the Jews in publick, proving from the scriptures that Jesus was the Messiah. Whilst Apollos was at Corinth, Paul, having pass'd through the upper provinces of Asia, arrived at Ephesus, where finding some disciples, he said to them, did you receive the holy spirit, when you made profession of your faith? they answer'd, we have not so much as heard of a holy spirit. what baptism then, said he, did you receive? they replied, the baptism of John. upon which Paul said, John indeed administer'd the baptism of repentance, but with this admonition, that they should believe in him, who was to come after, that is, in Jesus the Messias. when they heard this, they were initiated by baptism into the christian profession. and Paul having given them imposition of hands, the holy spirit came upon them, and they spoke foreign languages, and prophesied: the number of them being about twelve. At length Paul went to the synagogue, where he spoke with great freedom, and for three months he conferr'd with them to persuade them of the truth of the evangelical kingdom. but some of them being such obdurate infidels as to inveigh against the institution before the populace, he retired, and taking the disciples with him, he instructed them daily in the school of one Tyrannus. this he continued for two years; so that the Jews and proselytes of that part of Asia heard the doctrine of the Lord Jesus. the miracles which God wrought by the ministry of Paul being of such an extraordinary nature, that by applying the handkerchiefs, or aprons that had touch'd his skin, to the distemper'd, they were cured, and the evil spirits came out of the possessed. Upon this, certain vagabond Jews, who were exorcists, pretended to cure demoniacs by pronouncing the name of the Lord Jesus: their form being this, "I adjure you by Jesus whom Paul preaches." these practitioners were seven in number, the sons of Sceva a Jew, one of the chief priests. but the evil spirit said to them, "Jesus I know, and Paul I know; but who are ye?" the man who was possess'd immediately leapt upon them, got the better, and used them so roughly, they were forc'd to fly out of the house, cover'd with nothing but their wounds. this was known to all the Jews and Greeks, that liv'd at Ephesus, who were all seiz'd with fear, and the name of the Lord Jesus was exalted. many that believed came to confess, and give an account of their past actions. many that had practis'd magical arts, brought the books and publickly threw them into the fire: the value by computation amounting to fifty thousand pieces of silver. thus the christian doctrine flourish'd and prevail'd. after this, Paul had a design to pass thro' Macedonia and Achaia in his way to Jerusalem: purposing when he had been there to make a visit to Rome. he sent therefore Timothy and Erastus, two of his assistants in the ministry, before to Macedonia; but stay'd himself in Asia for some time. It was then a tumult happen'd at Ephesus upon account of the christian sect. for one Demetrius, a silver-smith, who made little models of Diana's temple, and so furnish'd a deal of employment to the workmen in that trade, summon'd the company, and thus address'd them, "tho' you know, sirs, it is by this craft that we are in such plight, yet your own eyes and ears have inform'd you, that not only at Ephesus, but almost throughout all Asia, this Paul by his persuasions has turn'd the heads of a world of people, asserting, that these are Gods of our own making, and not really such. so that not only our profession runs the risk of being vilified; but the temple of the great goddess Diana will be depreciated, and her majesty, so rever'd thro' all Asia, and the whole world, will be discarded." at these words, they were fir'd with indignation, and cry'd out, "great is Diana of the Ephesians." and the whole city was fill'd with confusion: all crouded in a body to the theatre, dragging with them Gaius and Aristarchus, both of Macedonia, who had travell'd with Paul. upon this Paul was bent upon going. to the populace, but was prevented by his disciples, and by the primates of Asia, who were his friends, and sent to desire he would not venture to the theatre: there the mob were in the utmost riot, some bawling out in one cry, some in another, and the greatest part at a loss to know why they were met. at last Alexander was disengag'd from the croud, and accus'd by the Jews. then he waved his hand, desiring to make his defence before them all. but when they knew he was a Jew, they cry'd out one and all for the space of two hours, "great is Diana of the Ephesians." at length the town-clerk appeased the people, and thus began, "who is there, O Ephesians, that does not know, that the city of Ephesus is the guardian of the temple of the great Diana, and of her statue, which fell from heaven: since this is incontestible, it behoves you to be easy, and free from any rash conduct: for the men you have brought here, have neither plunder'd your temples, nor inveigh'd against your goddess. if Demetrius and the other artists, that are with him, can lay their action against any man, the law is open, and the proconsul is near; let them begin their process. but if the contest be about other matters, it may be decided in a regular assembly. for we run the risk of being answerable for this day's sedition: there being no justifiable occasion for such a commotion." having thus harangued them, he broke up the assembly. This disturbance being over, Paul sent for the disciples, took his leave and departed for Macedonia. after having visited the faithful in those parts, and given them many exhortations, he went to Greece. there he stay'd three months; and then the Jews conspiring to surprize him at his embarkation for Syria, it was thought adviseable he should return thro' Macedonia. Sopater of Berea, Aristarchus and Secundus of Thessalonica, Gaius of Derby and Timothy, Tychicus and Trophimus both Asiatics, all accompanied him to Asia, and then advanc'd before and waited for us at Troas. after the feast of unleaven'd bread we sail'd from Philippi, and in five days we join'd them at Troas, where we stay'd seven. on the first day of the week we assembled to break bread, when Paul, who was to depart on the morrow, gave them a sermon, which lasted till midnight. in the upper chamber where we were assembled, several lamps were burning: and as Paul continued his discourse a great while, a young man, named Eutychus, who was sitting in the window, was seiz'd with a deep sleep, which quite o'er-came him; so that he fell down from the third story, and was taken up dead. so Paul went down, and stooping over him, he embraced him, and said, don't trouble your selves; for his life is in him. then Paul went up again, and having broken bread and eaten, he reassumed his discourse till break of day, and then departed. but the young man was brought in alive and well, to the joy of the whole assembly. As for us, we embark'd, and sail'd to Assos, where by appointment Paul was to be taken aboard, designing himself to go thither by land. meeting with him at Assos, we took him in and arriv'd at Mitylene: from thence we bore away: the next day we came off Chios, and the day after we pass'd by Samos, landing at Trogyllium, and arrived at Miletus the next day. for Paul had determined not to go ashore at Ephesus, to avoid losing time in Asia: because he was eager to get to Jerusalem, if possible, by the day of pentecost. At Miletus he sent a message to the pastors of the church at Ephesus, to come to him: and when they were arriv'd he told them, you know how I have always behav'd towards you from the first day of my arrival in Asia: how I have serv'd the Lord with all resignation, with tears, and trials occasion'd by the insidious practices of the Jews: that I have conceal'd nothing that might be useful to you, but have inform'd you of it, and instructed you therein, both in publick and in private: remonstrating both to Jews and Gentiles the advantages of a sincere repentance, and of believing in our Lord Jesus Christ. but now I am fix'd in my resolution to go to Jerusalem, without any apprehension of what may befal me there: save what the holy spirit in every city declares, "that bonds and afflictions wait for me." things that little affect me, nor is life so much my concern, as to finish my course, and the charge I receiv'd from the Lord Jesus, to attest the declaration of the divine favour. and now I am persuaded you will none of you see my face any more: whilst I have been among you, I have proclaim'd the kingdom of the Messias: I therefore declare to you at this present time, that I am not responsible for the ruin of any: for I have acquainted you with the whole dispensation of God without reserve. be therefore upon your guard to secure your selves, and the whole flock over which the holy spirit has made you overseers, to feed the church of God, which he has purchased with his own blood. for I know when I am gone, you will be oppress'd by wolves, that will not spare the flock. nay, among your own body some will start up to vent their intricate conceits, and draw a number of followers. be then upon the watch, and remember, that for three years I have not ceased by night, or by day to warn every soul of you, even with tears. and now, my brethren, I recommend you to God, and to his gracious dispensation, which is able to improve you, and secure to you the inheritance with those who are sanctify'd. I have not desir'd to get from any one either silver, or gold, or apparel. you yourselves can witness, that what was necessary for myself and those who were with me, these very hands have supply'd. my constant example has shown you that the disabled should be assisted by your labours, remembring the words of the Lord Jesus, who said, "it is a greater happiness to give than to receive." After this discourse, he kneeled down, and prayed with them all. then melted into tears, they fell upon his neck and kissed him, being more particularly afflicted at his having said, "they should see his face no more." and then they conducted him to the ship. After we were parted from them, and clear of land, we made directly for Cos, the next day to Rhodes, and from thence to Patara: where finding a vessel bound to Phoenicia, we went aboard, and put off. having made Cyprus, leaving it to the North, we took our course to Syria, and landed at Tyre, where the ship was to unlade her cargo. we staid seven days with the disciples we met there: who told Paul from the holy spirit, that he should not go to Jerusalem. that time being ended, we departed, being conducted by them in a body with the women and children quite out of the city, where we kneeled down on the shore, and prayed. then having taken our leave of one another, we embark'd and they went home. From Tyre we sail'd to Ptolemais, which ended our voyage. we saluted the brethren there, and staid a day with them. on the morrow we set out, and arriv'd at Cesarea, and went to the house of Philip the evangelist, with whom we lodg'd: he was one of the seven deacons, and had four daughters all virgins, prophetesses. after we had been there several days, a prophet arriv'd from Judea, one Agabus, who made us a visit. when taking Paul's girdle, he bound his own feet and hands, and said, "thus saith the holy spirit, so shall the Jews at Jerusalem bind the man, that owns this girdle, and deliver him into the hands of the Gentiles." upon hearing this, we and some of the city intreated him not to go to Jerusalem. but Paul replied, what do you mean by afflicting me thus with your tears? I am not only ready to meet my chains, but even to die at Jerusalem, for the name of the Lord Jesus. he being then inflexible, we desisted, saying, the will of the Lord be done. after this we prepar'd for our journey to Jerusalem.