7 occurrences in 7 dictionaries

Reference: Raca

American

A word derived from a Hebrew word signifying vain, trifling, brainless; otherwise, beggarly, worthless. It is thus translated by the Vulgate, in Jg 11:3; in the English, "vain men." The word includes a strong idea of contempt. Christ says, Mt 5:22, whoever shall say to his brother, "Raca," shall be condemned by the council, or sanhedrim. The term translated "fool" in the same passage, means vile and abandoned wretch.

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Easton

vain, empty, worthless, only found in Mt 5:22. The Jews used it as a word of contempt. It is derived from a root meaning "to spit."

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Fausets

Chaldee reeiqua, "worthless, vain man" (Jas 2:20; Jg 9:4; 11:3). Expressing contempt of one as at once despicable and worthless; three degrees of angry bitterness, and of corresponding punishment, are described Mt 5:22.

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Hastings

A term occurring only in Mt 5:22. It is a Semitic word, probably a popular pronunciation of the Rabbinic r

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Smith

Raca,

a term of reproach derived from the Chaldee reka, worthless. ("Raca denotes a certain looseness of life and manners, while 'fool,' in the same passage, means a downright wicked and reprobate person.")

Mt 5:22

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Watsons

RACA, a Syriac word which properly signifies empty, vain, beggarly, foolish, and which includes in it a strong idea of contempt. Our Saviour pronounces a censure on every person using this term to his neighbour, Mt 5:22, Lightfoot assures us that, in the writings of the Jews, the word raca is a term of the utmost contempt, and that it was usual to pronounce it with marked signs of indignation.

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