Thematic Bible




Thematic Bible







And after some days Paul said to Barnabas, "Let is go back and visit the brothers in every city in which we have proclaimed the word of the Lord. Let us see how they fare." Now Barnabas wanted to take with them John, who was called Mark. But Paul thought it unwise to take with them one who had deserted them to the Pamphylia, and had not gone on with them to the work. read more.
So there arose a sharp irritation, so that they parted company; Barnabas taking Mark with him, sailed away to Cyprus; while Paul chose Silas, and set forth commended by the brothers to the grace of God. He went through Syria and Cilicia, strengthening the churches. And he came also to Derbe and Lystra, where there was a certain disciple named Timothy, the son of a believing Jewess, and of a Greek father. He was well spoken of by the brothers in Lystra and Iconiun. Now Paul, wishing that this man should accompany him on his journey, took him and circumcised him because of the local Jews, who all knew that his father was a Greek. And as they went on their way through the cities they handed them the resolutions which the apostles and the elders in Jerusalem had ordained for them to keep. So the churches were strengthened in the faith and continued to increase in number daily. Then they went through Phrygia and Galatia, the Holy Spirit having forbidden them to proclaim the message in Asia. When they got as far as Mysia, they attempted to enter Bithynia, but the Spirit of Jesus would not permit it; and so they passed by Mysia and went on down to Troas. Here a vision appeared to Paul in the night. There stood a man of Macedonia, entreating him and saying, "Come over into Macedonia and help us!" So when he had seen the vision, we sought at once to go forth into Macedonia, because we concluded that God had called us to preach the gospel to them. So we set sail from Troas and ran a straight course to Samothrace. The next day we arrived in Neapolis, and thence came to Philippi, a city of Macedonia, the fore most in its district, a Roman colony. There we stayed for some time. On the Sabbath Day we went outside the city gate, to a riverside, where we supposed there was a place of prayer; and we sat down and talked to the women who had gathered there. Among them was a certain woman named Lydia, a seller of purple, who belonged to the town of Thyatira. She, since she was a worshiper of God, listened to us, and the Lord opened her heart to attend to what Paul said. When she was baptized, and her household, she urged us, saying, "If in your judgment I am a believer in the Lord, come and stay at my house." And she compelled us to come. Now as we were going to the place of prayer, a certain slave girl met us, who had a spirit of divination, and who brought her masters great gain by fortune-telling. She used to follow after Paul and us, crying out again and again, "These men are servants of the most high God, who proclaimed to you the way of salvation." She persisted in this for many days, until Paul, worn out, turned round and said to the spirit, "I charge you, in the name of Jesus Christ, to come out of her." In that very hour it came out of her. But when her owners saw that their hopes of gain were gone, they seized Paul and Silas, and dragged them before the magistrates, into the market-place. Then they brought them before the praetors, saying. "These fellows are Jews, who are making a great disturbance in our city. "They are teaching customs which it is not lawful for us as Romans to adopt or practise." The crowd, too, rose up together against them, and the praetors, after having them stripped, and after ordering them to be flogged, had many lashes inflicted upon them, and put them in prison, with a charge to the jailer to keep them safe. On receiving so strict an order he cast them into the inner prison, and made their feet fast in the stocks. But at midnight, while Paul and Silas were praying and singing hymns to God, and the prisoners were listening to them, suddenly there was a great earthquake, so that the very foundations of the prison-house were shaken; and instantly all the doors were opened, and every one's chains fell off. The jailer, roused from sleep, and seeing the doors wide open, drew his sword and was about to kill himself, because he thought that the prisoners had escaped. But Paul shouted loudly to him. "Do yourself no harm; for we are all here!" So he called for lights, and sprang in, and, trembling for fear, fell down before Paul and Silas, and brought them out, saying, "Sirs, what must I do to be saved?" "Believe on the Lord Jesus," they answered, "and you will be saved, you and all your household." Then they spoke the message of the Lord to him, as well as to all who were in his house. And he took them, the same hour of the night, and washed their wounds, and he was baptized at once, he and all his. And after bringing them up into his house, he set food before them, overjoyed with all his household in having believed in God. But in the morning the praetors sent their lictors with the order, "Let these men go." The jailer reported the words to Paul, saying. "The praetors have sent to release you; so come out, and go in peace." But Paul said: "They have flogged us publicly, uncondemned, men that are Roman citizens; and have thrown us into prison. Are they now going to get rid of us secretly? No, indeed! Let them come here, themselves and take us out." The lictors reported these words to the praetors, who were frightened when they heard that they were Romans. So they came and conciliated them, and after taking them out of prison, begged them to leave the town. So Paul and Silas came out of the prison, and went to Lydia's house; and after they had seen the brethren and encouraged them, they left Philippi. Now when they had gone through Amphipolis and Apollonia, they came to Thessalonica. Here there was a Jewish synagogue, and Paul, according to his usual custom, went in to them and, for three Sabbath Days, he reasoned with them out of the Scriptures, explaining and quoting passages to prove that the Messiah had to suffer and to rise again from the dead and that "This Jesus whom I am proclaiming unto you is the Messiah." Some were persuaded and attached themselves to Paul and Silas, including a number of devout Greeks, and a large number of the leading women. But the Jews, moved with jealousy, called to their aid certain ill-favored and idle fellows, formed a mob, and began to set the town in an uproar. Assaulting the house of Jason, they sought to bring them out to the people. And when they had failed to find Paul and Silas, they began to drag Jason and some of the brethren before the politarchs, shouting. "These fellows who have upset the habitable earth are come hither also. "Jason has received them, and they all act contrary to the decrees of Caesar, saying that there is another king, one Jesus." Both the crowd and the politarchs were disturbed when they heard this, but when they had taken security from Jason and the rest, they let them go. Now the brothers sent Paul and Silas away by night to Berea. When they got there they betook themselves to the Jewish synagogue. The Jews of Berea were more noble than those in Thessalonica, in that they very readily received the message with all readiness of mind, and day after day searched the Scriptures to see whether these things were so. So many of them became believers, and so did not a few Greeks, women of honorable estate, and men. As soon as the Jews in Thessalonica learned that the word of God was preached by Paul in Berea also, they came there, and stirred up and troubled the crowds. Then the brothers at once sent Paul down to the sea, but Silas and Timothy remained behind. Those who were caring for Paul brought him as far as Athens, and there left him, with instructions to Silas and Timothy to come to him with all speed. While Paul was waiting for them at Athens, his spirit was stirred within him, when he noticed that the city was full of idols. He argued in the synagogues with the Jews and the devout proselytes, and also daily in the market-place with those that met him there. A few of the Epicurean and Stoic philosophers also encountered him again and again. Some were saying, "What has this beggarly fellow to say?" Others said, "He seems to be a setter forth of strange gods," because he preached Jesus and the resurrection. Then they laid hold of him and brought him up to Mars Hill, saying. "May we be told what this new teaching of yours is? "For you are bringing certain strange things to our ears. We want to know, therefore, what these things mean." (Now all the Athenians and the strangers sojourning there spent their time in nothing else, but to tell or to hear some new thing.) So Paul stood up in the center of Mars Hill, and said: "Men of Athens, I perceive that in all respects you are remarkably religious. "For as I was passing along and observing your objects of worship, I found also an altar with this inscription, 'TO AN UNKNOWN GOD.' What you are worshiping in ignorance, this I am proclaiming to you. "The God who made the universe and all things in it, he, being Lord of heaven and earth, does not dwell in temples made with hands, "neither is he served by men's hands, as though he needed anything, since he himself gives to all life and breath and all things. "He has made of one blood every nation of men to dwell on all the face of the earth, having determined their appointed seasons and the bounds of their habitation, "so that they might seek God, if perhaps they might feel after him and find him, though he is not far from every on of us; "for in him we live and move and have our being; as certain even of your own poets have said, "'For we also are his offspring.' "Since then we are God's offspring, we ought not to imagine that the Godhead is like to gold, or silver, or stone, graven by art and device of man. "The times of ignorance God overlooked, but he now commands all men that they should all, everywhere, repent; inasmuch as he has fixed a day in which he will judge the world justly, by the Man whom he has ordained, and he has given proof of all this by raising him from the dead." But on hearing of the resurrection of the dead, some began to mock; but others said, "We will hear you again on that subject." So Paul withdrew from them. A few, however, attached themselves to him and believed, among whom was Dionysius the Areopagite, and a woman named Damaris, and some others. After this Paul left Athens and went to Corinth. Here he found a certain Jew named Aquila, a native of Pontus, who had recently come from Italy with his wife, Priscilla, because Claudius had ordered all Jews to leave Rome. Paul came to them, and because he was of the same trade with them, he lodged with them, and worked with them??or by trade they were tentmakers. Every Sabbath he used to preach in the synagogue, and tried to persuade both Jews and Greeks. And when Silas and Timothy arrived from Macedonia, Paul was engrossed in his message, earnestly testifying to the Jews that Jesus was the Messiah. But as they opposed him and abused him, he shook out his garments in protest, and said: "Your blood be upon your own hands. I am clean. From now on I will go to the Gentiles." So he left the place, and went into the house of a man named Titus Justus, a worshiper of God, whose house adjoined the synagogue. And Crispus, the warden of the synagogue, believed on the Lord, with all his household; and many of the Corinthians from time to time listened, believed, and were baptized. And the Lord said to Paul in a vision, by night. "Have no fear; go on speaking, and do not keep silent; "for I am with you, and no one shall set upon you to injure you; for I have very many people in this city." So he lived there a year and six months and continued to teach them the word of God. But when Gallio was proconsul of Achaia, the Jews with one accord rose against Paul, and brought him before the tribunal. "This fellow," they said, "is persuading men to offer unlawful worship to God." Paul was about to open his mouth, when Gallio said to the Jews. "If it had been some misdemeanor or wicked villainy, it would have been within reason for me to listen to you Jews; but as these are merely questions about words and names and your own law, you yourselves must see to it. I am not willing to be a judge of these matters." And he drove them from the tribunal. Then they all laid hold of Sosthenes, the warden of the synagogue, and beat him in front of the tribunal; but Gallio took no notice. And Paul after remaining in Corinth some time longer, took leave of the brothers, and sailed away to Syria, accompanied by Priscilla and Aquila. As Paul was under a vow, he had his head shaved at Cenchrea. When they came to Ephesus he left them there; but he himself entered into the synagogue and reasoned with the Jews. When they begged him to stay longer, he would not consent, but said, as he took leave of them, "I will return again to you, if God will." Then, setting sail from Ephesus, he landed at Caesarea; he went up to Jerusalem and saluted the church, and came down to Antioch.


Every Sabbath he used to preach in the synagogue, and tried to persuade both Jews and Greeks. And when Silas and Timothy arrived from Macedonia, Paul was engrossed in his message, earnestly testifying to the Jews that Jesus was the Messiah. But as they opposed him and abused him, he shook out his garments in protest, and said: "Your blood be upon your own hands. I am clean. From now on I will go to the Gentiles." read more.
So he left the place, and went into the house of a man named Titus Justus, a worshiper of God, whose house adjoined the synagogue. And Crispus, the warden of the synagogue, believed on the Lord, with all his household; and many of the Corinthians from time to time listened, believed, and were baptized. And the Lord said to Paul in a vision, by night. "Have no fear; go on speaking, and do not keep silent; "for I am with you, and no one shall set upon you to injure you; for I have very many people in this city." So he lived there a year and six months and continued to teach them the word of God.


Every Sabbath he used to preach in the synagogue, and tried to persuade both Jews and Greeks. And when Silas and Timothy arrived from Macedonia, Paul was engrossed in his message, earnestly testifying to the Jews that Jesus was the Messiah. But as they opposed him and abused him, he shook out his garments in protest, and said: "Your blood be upon your own hands. I am clean. From now on I will go to the Gentiles." read more.
So he left the place, and went into the house of a man named Titus Justus, a worshiper of God, whose house adjoined the synagogue. And Crispus, the warden of the synagogue, believed on the Lord, with all his household; and many of the Corinthians from time to time listened, believed, and were baptized. And the Lord said to Paul in a vision, by night. "Have no fear; go on speaking, and do not keep silent; "for I am with you, and no one shall set upon you to injure you; for I have very many people in this city." So he lived there a year and six months and continued to teach them the word of God.


And after some days Paul said to Barnabas, "Let is go back and visit the brothers in every city in which we have proclaimed the word of the Lord. Let us see how they fare." Now Barnabas wanted to take with them John, who was called Mark. But Paul thought it unwise to take with them one who had deserted them to the Pamphylia, and had not gone on with them to the work. read more.
So there arose a sharp irritation, so that they parted company; Barnabas taking Mark with him, sailed away to Cyprus; while Paul chose Silas, and set forth commended by the brothers to the grace of God. He went through Syria and Cilicia, strengthening the churches. And he came also to Derbe and Lystra, where there was a certain disciple named Timothy, the son of a believing Jewess, and of a Greek father. He was well spoken of by the brothers in Lystra and Iconiun. Now Paul, wishing that this man should accompany him on his journey, took him and circumcised him because of the local Jews, who all knew that his father was a Greek. And as they went on their way through the cities they handed them the resolutions which the apostles and the elders in Jerusalem had ordained for them to keep. So the churches were strengthened in the faith and continued to increase in number daily. Then they went through Phrygia and Galatia, the Holy Spirit having forbidden them to proclaim the message in Asia. When they got as far as Mysia, they attempted to enter Bithynia, but the Spirit of Jesus would not permit it; and so they passed by Mysia and went on down to Troas. Here a vision appeared to Paul in the night. There stood a man of Macedonia, entreating him and saying, "Come over into Macedonia and help us!" So when he had seen the vision, we sought at once to go forth into Macedonia, because we concluded that God had called us to preach the gospel to them. So we set sail from Troas and ran a straight course to Samothrace. The next day we arrived in Neapolis, and thence came to Philippi, a city of Macedonia, the fore most in its district, a Roman colony. There we stayed for some time. On the Sabbath Day we went outside the city gate, to a riverside, where we supposed there was a place of prayer; and we sat down and talked to the women who had gathered there. Among them was a certain woman named Lydia, a seller of purple, who belonged to the town of Thyatira. She, since she was a worshiper of God, listened to us, and the Lord opened her heart to attend to what Paul said. When she was baptized, and her household, she urged us, saying, "If in your judgment I am a believer in the Lord, come and stay at my house." And she compelled us to come. Now as we were going to the place of prayer, a certain slave girl met us, who had a spirit of divination, and who brought her masters great gain by fortune-telling. She used to follow after Paul and us, crying out again and again, "These men are servants of the most high God, who proclaimed to you the way of salvation." She persisted in this for many days, until Paul, worn out, turned round and said to the spirit, "I charge you, in the name of Jesus Christ, to come out of her." In that very hour it came out of her. But when her owners saw that their hopes of gain were gone, they seized Paul and Silas, and dragged them before the magistrates, into the market-place. Then they brought them before the praetors, saying. "These fellows are Jews, who are making a great disturbance in our city. "They are teaching customs which it is not lawful for us as Romans to adopt or practise." The crowd, too, rose up together against them, and the praetors, after having them stripped, and after ordering them to be flogged, had many lashes inflicted upon them, and put them in prison, with a charge to the jailer to keep them safe. On receiving so strict an order he cast them into the inner prison, and made their feet fast in the stocks. But at midnight, while Paul and Silas were praying and singing hymns to God, and the prisoners were listening to them, suddenly there was a great earthquake, so that the very foundations of the prison-house were shaken; and instantly all the doors were opened, and every one's chains fell off. The jailer, roused from sleep, and seeing the doors wide open, drew his sword and was about to kill himself, because he thought that the prisoners had escaped. But Paul shouted loudly to him. "Do yourself no harm; for we are all here!" So he called for lights, and sprang in, and, trembling for fear, fell down before Paul and Silas, and brought them out, saying, "Sirs, what must I do to be saved?" "Believe on the Lord Jesus," they answered, "and you will be saved, you and all your household." Then they spoke the message of the Lord to him, as well as to all who were in his house. And he took them, the same hour of the night, and washed their wounds, and he was baptized at once, he and all his. And after bringing them up into his house, he set food before them, overjoyed with all his household in having believed in God. But in the morning the praetors sent their lictors with the order, "Let these men go." The jailer reported the words to Paul, saying. "The praetors have sent to release you; so come out, and go in peace." But Paul said: "They have flogged us publicly, uncondemned, men that are Roman citizens; and have thrown us into prison. Are they now going to get rid of us secretly? No, indeed! Let them come here, themselves and take us out." The lictors reported these words to the praetors, who were frightened when they heard that they were Romans. So they came and conciliated them, and after taking them out of prison, begged them to leave the town. So Paul and Silas came out of the prison, and went to Lydia's house; and after they had seen the brethren and encouraged them, they left Philippi. Now when they had gone through Amphipolis and Apollonia, they came to Thessalonica. Here there was a Jewish synagogue, and Paul, according to his usual custom, went in to them and, for three Sabbath Days, he reasoned with them out of the Scriptures, explaining and quoting passages to prove that the Messiah had to suffer and to rise again from the dead and that "This Jesus whom I am proclaiming unto you is the Messiah." Some were persuaded and attached themselves to Paul and Silas, including a number of devout Greeks, and a large number of the leading women. But the Jews, moved with jealousy, called to their aid certain ill-favored and idle fellows, formed a mob, and began to set the town in an uproar. Assaulting the house of Jason, they sought to bring them out to the people. And when they had failed to find Paul and Silas, they began to drag Jason and some of the brethren before the politarchs, shouting. "These fellows who have upset the habitable earth are come hither also. "Jason has received them, and they all act contrary to the decrees of Caesar, saying that there is another king, one Jesus." Both the crowd and the politarchs were disturbed when they heard this, but when they had taken security from Jason and the rest, they let them go. Now the brothers sent Paul and Silas away by night to Berea. When they got there they betook themselves to the Jewish synagogue. The Jews of Berea were more noble than those in Thessalonica, in that they very readily received the message with all readiness of mind, and day after day searched the Scriptures to see whether these things were so. So many of them became believers, and so did not a few Greeks, women of honorable estate, and men. As soon as the Jews in Thessalonica learned that the word of God was preached by Paul in Berea also, they came there, and stirred up and troubled the crowds. Then the brothers at once sent Paul down to the sea, but Silas and Timothy remained behind. Those who were caring for Paul brought him as far as Athens, and there left him, with instructions to Silas and Timothy to come to him with all speed. While Paul was waiting for them at Athens, his spirit was stirred within him, when he noticed that the city was full of idols. He argued in the synagogues with the Jews and the devout proselytes, and also daily in the market-place with those that met him there. A few of the Epicurean and Stoic philosophers also encountered him again and again. Some were saying, "What has this beggarly fellow to say?" Others said, "He seems to be a setter forth of strange gods," because he preached Jesus and the resurrection. Then they laid hold of him and brought him up to Mars Hill, saying. "May we be told what this new teaching of yours is? "For you are bringing certain strange things to our ears. We want to know, therefore, what these things mean." (Now all the Athenians and the strangers sojourning there spent their time in nothing else, but to tell or to hear some new thing.) So Paul stood up in the center of Mars Hill, and said: "Men of Athens, I perceive that in all respects you are remarkably religious. "For as I was passing along and observing your objects of worship, I found also an altar with this inscription, 'TO AN UNKNOWN GOD.' What you are worshiping in ignorance, this I am proclaiming to you. "The God who made the universe and all things in it, he, being Lord of heaven and earth, does not dwell in temples made with hands, "neither is he served by men's hands, as though he needed anything, since he himself gives to all life and breath and all things. "He has made of one blood every nation of men to dwell on all the face of the earth, having determined their appointed seasons and the bounds of their habitation, "so that they might seek God, if perhaps they might feel after him and find him, though he is not far from every on of us; "for in him we live and move and have our being; as certain even of your own poets have said, "'For we also are his offspring.' "Since then we are God's offspring, we ought not to imagine that the Godhead is like to gold, or silver, or stone, graven by art and device of man. "The times of ignorance God overlooked, but he now commands all men that they should all, everywhere, repent; inasmuch as he has fixed a day in which he will judge the world justly, by the Man whom he has ordained, and he has given proof of all this by raising him from the dead." But on hearing of the resurrection of the dead, some began to mock; but others said, "We will hear you again on that subject." So Paul withdrew from them. A few, however, attached themselves to him and believed, among whom was Dionysius the Areopagite, and a woman named Damaris, and some others. After this Paul left Athens and went to Corinth. Here he found a certain Jew named Aquila, a native of Pontus, who had recently come from Italy with his wife, Priscilla, because Claudius had ordered all Jews to leave Rome. Paul came to them, and because he was of the same trade with them, he lodged with them, and worked with them??or by trade they were tentmakers. Every Sabbath he used to preach in the synagogue, and tried to persuade both Jews and Greeks. And when Silas and Timothy arrived from Macedonia, Paul was engrossed in his message, earnestly testifying to the Jews that Jesus was the Messiah. But as they opposed him and abused him, he shook out his garments in protest, and said: "Your blood be upon your own hands. I am clean. From now on I will go to the Gentiles." So he left the place, and went into the house of a man named Titus Justus, a worshiper of God, whose house adjoined the synagogue. And Crispus, the warden of the synagogue, believed on the Lord, with all his household; and many of the Corinthians from time to time listened, believed, and were baptized. And the Lord said to Paul in a vision, by night. "Have no fear; go on speaking, and do not keep silent; "for I am with you, and no one shall set upon you to injure you; for I have very many people in this city." So he lived there a year and six months and continued to teach them the word of God. But when Gallio was proconsul of Achaia, the Jews with one accord rose against Paul, and brought him before the tribunal. "This fellow," they said, "is persuading men to offer unlawful worship to God." Paul was about to open his mouth, when Gallio said to the Jews. "If it had been some misdemeanor or wicked villainy, it would have been within reason for me to listen to you Jews; but as these are merely questions about words and names and your own law, you yourselves must see to it. I am not willing to be a judge of these matters." And he drove them from the tribunal. Then they all laid hold of Sosthenes, the warden of the synagogue, and beat him in front of the tribunal; but Gallio took no notice. And Paul after remaining in Corinth some time longer, took leave of the brothers, and sailed away to Syria, accompanied by Priscilla and Aquila. As Paul was under a vow, he had his head shaved at Cenchrea. When they came to Ephesus he left them there; but he himself entered into the synagogue and reasoned with the Jews. When they begged him to stay longer, he would not consent, but said, as he took leave of them, "I will return again to you, if God will." Then, setting sail from Ephesus, he landed at Caesarea; he went up to Jerusalem and saluted the church, and came down to Antioch.



"'I will deliver you from the Jewish people, and from the Gentiles to whom I am sending you to open their eyes


And the Lord said to Paul in a vision, by night. "Have no fear; go on speaking, and do not keep silent; "for I am with you, and no one shall set upon you to injure you; for I have very many people in this city."






He said to them, "Go take your stand in the Temple, and continue to tell the people all the words of this Life." When they heard this they went at early dawn to the Temple, and began to teach. Meantime when the high priest and his followers arrived, they summoned the Sanhedrin and all the Council of the Elders of the sons of Israel, and sent to the prison to fetch the apostles.

And the Lord said to Paul in a vision, by night. "Have no fear; go on speaking, and do not keep silent; "for I am with you, and no one shall set upon you to injure you; for I have very many people in this city."

"Then he said: "'The God of our forefathers has appointed you to know his will; and to see the righteous One, and to hear a voice from his mouth. "'For before the face of all men you will be a witness for him of what you have seen and heard.