Parallel Verses

New American Standard Bible

If from human motives I fought with wild beasts at Ephesus, what does it profit me? If the dead are not raised, LET US EAT AND DRINK, FOR TOMORROW WE DIE.

King James Version

If after the manner of men I have fought with beasts at Ephesus, what advantageth it me, if the dead rise not? let us eat and drink; for to morrow we die.

Holman Bible

If I fought wild animals in Ephesus with only human hope, what good does that do me? If the dead are not raised, Let us eat and drink, for tomorrow we die.

International Standard Version

If I have fought with wild animals in Ephesus from merely human motives, what do I get out of it? If the dead are not raised, "Let's eat and drink, for tomorrow we die."

A Conservative Version

If in respect to men I fought with beasts at Ephesus, what is the benefit to me if the dead are not raised? Let us eat and drink, for tomorrow we die.

American Standard Version

If after the manner of men I fought with beasts at Ephesus, what doth it profit me? If the dead are not raised, let us eat and drink, for to-morrow we die.

Amplified

What do I gain if, merely from the human point of view, I fought with [wild] beasts at Ephesus? If the dead are not raised [at all], let us eat and drink, for tomorrow we will be dead.

An Understandable Version

What benefit was it to me, from a human standpoint, if I fought wild animals in Ephesus, and [yet] the dead are not raised? [Note: This probably refers to Paul facing ferocious opposition from people there in Ephesus]. We should [just] eat and drink, for tomorrow we [may] die.

Anderson New Testament

If, to speak as a man, I have fought with wild beasts at Ephesus, what advantage is it to me, if the dead rise not? Let us eat and drink, for to-morrow we die.

Bible in Basic English

If, after the way of men, I was fighting with beasts at Ephesus, what profit is it to me? If the dead do not come to life again, let us take our pleasure in feasting, for tomorrow we come to an end.

Common New Testament

If I fought wild beasts in Ephesus for merely human reasons, what have I gained? If the dead are not raised, "Let us eat and drink, for tomorrow we die."

Daniel Mace New Testament

besides, my engaging with those monsters, as I may say, at Ephesus, what advantage was it to me? if the dead don't rise, "let us eat and drink, for to-morrow we die."

Darby Translation

If, to speak after the manner of man, I have fought with beasts in Ephesus, what is the profit to me if those that are dead do not rise? let us eat and drink; for to-morrow we die.

Godbey New Testament

If after the manner of men I have fought with the wild beasts in Ephesus, what profit is it to me? If the dead rise not, let us eat and drink, for to-morrow we die.

Goodspeed New Testament

From the human point of view, what good is it to me that I have fought wild animals here in Ephesus? If the dead do not rise at all, "Let us eat and drink, for we will be dead tomorrow!"

John Wesley New Testament

I have fought with wild beasts at Ephesus, what advantageth it me, if the dead rise not? Let us eat and drink; for tomorrow we die.

Jubilee 2000 Bible

If after the manner of men I have fought with beasts at Ephesus, what does it advantage me, if the dead do not rise? let us eat and drink; for tomorrow we die.

Julia Smith Translation

If according to man I fought with wild beasts at Ephesus, what the profit to me, if the dead rise not? let us eat and drink; for to morrow we die.

King James 2000

If after the manner of men I have fought with beasts at Ephesus, what is the gain to me, if the dead rise not? let us eat and drink; for tomorrow we die.

Lexham Expanded Bible

If according to a human perspective I fought wild beasts at Ephesus, what benefit [is it] to me? If the dead are not raised, let us eat and drink, for tomorrow we die.

Modern King James verseion

If according to man I fought with beasts in Ephesus, what advantage is to me if the dead are not raised? "Let us eat and drink, for tomorrow we die!"

Modern Spelling Tyndale-Coverdale

That I have fought with beasts at Ephesus after the manner of men, what advantageth it me, if the dead rise not again? "Let us eat and drink, tomorrow we shall die."

Moffatt New Testament

What would it avail me that, humanly speaking, I 'fought with wild beasts' at Ephesus? If dead men do not rise, let us eat and drink, for we will be dead to-morrow!

Montgomery New Testament

If after the manner of men I have fought with wild beasts at Ephesus, what good does it do me? If the dead do not rise, Let us eat and drink, For we shall be dead tomorrow.

NET Bible

If from a human point of view I fought with wild beasts at Ephesus, what did it benefit me? If the dead are not raised, let us eat and drink, for tomorrow we die.

New Heart English Bible

If I fought with animals at Ephesus for human purposes, what does it profit me? If the dead are not raised, then "let us eat and drink, for tomorrow we die."

Noyes New Testament

If with the views of men I fought with wild beasts at Ephesus, what advantage is it to me? If the dead rise not, "let us eat and drink, for tomorrow we die."

Sawyer New Testament

If after the manner of men I have fought with beasts at Ephesus, of what advantage is it to me? If the dead rise not, let us eat and drink, for to-morrow we die.

The Emphasized Bible

If, after the manner of men, I have fought with wild-beasts at Ephesus, what, to me, the profit? If the dead are not raised, Let us eat and drink, for, tomorrow, we die.

Thomas Haweis New Testament

If after the manner of men I have fought with wild beasts at Ephesus, of what advantage would it be to me, if the dead did not rise again? shall we eat and drink; because to-morrow we die?

Twentieth Century New Testament

If with only human hopes I had fought in the arena at Ephesus, what should I have gained by it? If the dead do not rise, then-'Let us eat and drink, for to-morrow we shall die'!

Webster

If after the manner of men I have fought with beasts at Ephesus, what advantage is it to me, if the dead rise not? let us eat and drink; for to-morrow we die.

Weymouth New Testament

If from merely human motives I have fought with wild beasts in Ephesus, what profit is it to me? If the dead do not rise, let us eat and drink, for tomorrow we are to die.

Williams New Testament

If from merely human motives I have fought wild beasts here in Ephesus, what profit will it be to me? If the dead are never raised at all, "Let us eat and drink, for tomorrow we shall be dead."

World English Bible

If I fought with animals at Ephesus for human purposes, what does it profit me? If the dead are not raised, then "let us eat and drink, for tomorrow we die."

Worrell New Testament

If in human fashion I fought with wild beasts at Ephesus, what is the profit to me? If the dead rise not; "Let us eat and drink; for to-morrow we die."

Worsley New Testament

If, to speak as a man, I fought with beasts at Ephesus, what advantage have I, if the dead rise not? Let us eat and drink, for to-morrow we die. ---

Youngs Literal Translation

if after the manner of a man with wild beasts I fought in Ephesus, what the advantage to me if the dead do not rise? let us eat and drink, for to-morrow we die!

Interlinear

English(KJV)
Strong's
Root Form
Definition
Usage
If
εἰ 
Ei 
if, whether, that, not tr,
Usage: 218

κατά 
Kata 
according to, after, against, in, by, daily , as,
Usage: 428

of men
ἄνθρωπος 
Anthropos 
man, not tr,
Usage: 316

θηριομαχέω 
theriomacheo 
Usage: 1

at
ἐν 
En 
in, by, with, among, at, on, through,
Usage: 2128

Ἔφεσος 
Ephesos 
Usage: 14

τίς 
Tis 
Usage: 344

ὄφελος 
Ophelos 
Usage: 3

me
μοί 
Moi 
me, my, I, mine
Usage: 152

if
εἰ 
Ei 
if, whether, that, not tr,
Usage: 218

the dead
νεκρός 
Nekros 
Usage: 105

ἐγείρω 
Egeiro 
Usage: 101

not
οὐ 
Ou 
not, no, cannot ,
Usage: 1032

let us eat
φάγω 
Phago 
Usage: 54

and

and, also, even, both, then, so, likewise, not tr., , vr and
Usage: 0

πίνω πίω πόω 
Pino 
Usage: 31

γάρ 
Gar 
for, , not tr
Usage: 825

to morrow
αὔριον 
Aurion 
Usage: 8

Context Readings

Concerning The Resurrection Of The Dead

31 I affirm, brethren, by the boasting in you which I have in Christ Jesus our Lord, I die daily. 32 If from human motives I fought with wild beasts at Ephesus, what does it profit me? If the dead are not raised, LET US EAT AND DRINK, FOR TOMORROW WE DIE. 33 Do not be deceived: "Bad company corrupts good morals."



Cross References

Isaiah 22:13

Instead, there is gaiety and gladness, Killing of cattle and slaughtering of sheep, Eating of meat and drinking of wine: "Let us eat and drink, for tomorrow we may die."

Luke 12:19

'And I will say to my soul, "Soul, you have many goods laid up for many years to come; take your ease, eat, drink and be merry."'

Isaiah 56:12

"Come," they say, "let us get wine, and let us drink heavily of strong drink; And tomorrow will be like today, only more so."

Job 35:3

"For you say, 'What advantage will it be to You? What profit will I have, more than if I had sinned?'

Psalm 73:13

Surely in vain I have kept my heart pure And washed my hands in innocence;

Ecclesiastes 2:24

There is nothing better for a man than to eat and drink and tell himself that his labor is good This also I have seen that it is from the hand of God.

Ecclesiastes 11:9

Rejoice, young man, during your childhood, and let your heart be pleasant during the days of young manhood. And follow the impulses of your heart and the desires of your eyes Yet know that God will bring you to judgment for all these things.

Malachi 3:14-15

"You have said, 'It is vain to serve God; and what profit is it that we have kept His charge, and that we have walked in mourning before the LORD of hosts?

Luke 9:25

"For what is a man profited if he gains the whole world, and loses or forfeits himself?

Acts 18:19

They came to Ephesus, and he left them there Now he himself entered the synagogue and reasoned with the Jews.

Acts 19:1

It happened that while Apollos was at Corinth, Paul passed through the upper country and came to Ephesus, and found some disciples.

Acts 19:23-41

About that time there occurred no small disturbance concerning the Way.

Romans 6:19

I am speaking in human terms because of the weakness of your flesh For just as you presented your members as slaves to impurity and to lawlessness, resulting in further lawlessness, so now present your members as slaves to righteousness, resulting in sanctification.

2 Corinthians 1:8-10

For we do not want you to be unaware, brethren, of our affliction which came to us in Asia, that we were burdened excessively, beyond our strength, so that we despaired even of life;

Galatians 3:15

Brethren, I speak in terms of human relations: even though it is only a man's covenant, yet when it has been ratified, no one sets it aside or adds conditions to it.

2 Peter 2:12

But these, like unreasoning animals, born as creatures of instinct to be captured and killed, reviling where they have no knowledge, will in the destruction of those creatures also be destroyed,

Jude 1:10

But these men revile the things which they do not understand; and the things which they know by instinct, like unreasoning animals, by these things they are destroyed.



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